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Archive for April, 2008

Story from BBC.

Morrissey saves anti-racism gig

Morrissey

Morrissey recently sued two magazines for suggesting he was racist

Singer Morrissey has stepped in to save an anti-racism music festival from possible financial ruin.

The Rock Against Racism concert is taking place in London on Sunday and organisers said it was facing a £75,000 deficit after a main sponsor withdrew.

But the former Smiths singer has made a personal donation and rallied together his management, promoters and booking agency to help make up the shortfall.

The star said it was a “historic event” that “must be allowed to go ahead”.

He hailed the free event’s “important, anti-racist, message”.

‘Generous contribution’

“This is something I am committed to and we appreciate everyone coming together so quickly to make it happen,” he said.

Organisers Martin Smith and Lee Billingham said they contacted Morrissey and other artists after the sponsorship fell through.

“We’re extremely grateful for Morrissey’s generous financial contribution,” they said.

Headliners at the concert in Victoria Park include The Good The Bad & The Queen, Jay Sean, Hard-Fi, The View and Get Cape Wear Cape Fly.

Morrissey recently won an apology from Word magazine for suggesting he was a racist and a hypocrite.

He is also suing the NME after it quoted him as saying Britain had lost its identity due to high levels of immigration.

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Bristol2007 is quite literally speechless in the latest twist in the narrative of Multicultural Britain.  Even more surprised than Trevor Phillips today saying he sees where Enogh Powell was coming from.  This story – displayed here in-full copyed from the BBC – is so bizarre it couldn’t have been invented.  Absolute genius on their part!

The quite though that does disturb me is;

“Under the scheme, migrants can only work in the UK if they meet criteria including the ability to speak proficient English.

“It’s crazy,” said Salim Chowdhury Miah, a restaurateur and local councillor from Derby. “My chef can’t speak any English, but he doesn’t need to. He’s there to make curry.

The complexity here is that Mr Chowdhury needs to also know that his chef may be a father with a child in a local school.  If he can’t speak English then there is already a disconnect happening.  Immigration on social terms can’t ignore the social immplications also.  Sure, go ahead and bring in your chef from overseas Mr Chowdury, but at least make them feel welcome by paying for him to be able to understand the society that he is now living in.  ESOL classes are quite cheap these days.

Article from:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7357435.stm

 

Battle to ‘save great British curry’

By Jon Kelly
BBC News

Protest organised by the Ethnic Catering Alliance

Protesters said the government would pay the price at the ballot box

Thousands of protesters in London’s Trafalgar Square insisted they were on a mission – to save the great British curry.

 

There was noise, colour and a warm welcome to any curious onlookers who stopped by.

 

These protesters, more than most, appreciated the importance of getting the Front of House right.

 

They were here to complain about immigration rules which, they say, are harming the UK’s ethnic restaurants.

 

And, via a direct appeal to the British love of tikka masala and chow mein, their message was straightforward.

 

“Stop politics,” read the placards. “Save currynomics.”

 

‘Britain’s culture’

 

One protester who has seen the status of ethnic dishes transformed from exotic oddities to a staple of the UK diet is Mohammed Ohid Uddi, 43, who came arrived from Bangladesh in 1976.

 

He now runs the Spicy World restaurant in London’s Victoria, and insisted that it is the government’s patriotic duty to support the curry industry.

 

Shofiqul Islam
Restaurants like mine make a huge contribution to the British economy
Shofiqul Islam

 

 

“Curry isn’t Indian or Bangladeshi food anymore,” he says. “It’s British food now.

 

“It’s part of Britain’s culture, and we need everyone’s support to preserve it.”

 

The demonstrators – under the banner of the Ethnic Catering Alliance – say a new points-based system for non-EU immigrants has led to a severe shortage of kitchen staff.

 

Under the scheme, migrants can only work in the UK if they meet criteria including the ability to speak proficient English.

 

“It’s crazy,” said Salim Chowdhury Miah, a restaurateur and local councillor from Derby. “My chef can’t speak any English, but he doesn’t need to. He’s there to make curry.

 

“Second and third generation immigrants don’t want to work in kitchens, so the only staff who know the recipes come from overseas. But now we’re being penalised.”

 

Shofiqul Islam, 29, from Chester, agrees. Demand is booming, but he can only keep his restaurant going by drafting in his wife and brother to help out.

 

“The government say you should recruit European people or British people,” he says.

 

“I’ve tried that. It didn’t work. They don’t want to do it.

 

“Restaurants like mine make a huge contribution to the British economy, and people want to come and eat in them. Why can’t the government let us give them what they want?”

 

‘Didn’t listen’

 

Although most of the protesters had their roots in the subcontinent, other communities were represented too.

 

Protester Vanessa Fong

Vanessa Fong said she was struggling to recruit kitchen staff

 

Vanessa Fong, 44, runs a Chinese takeaway in Watford, Herts.

 

“It’s very, very difficult for me to recruit kitchen staff,” she said.

 

“Normally, I would get people in from China or Malaysia.

 

“But the rules make that very difficult, and people from this country don’t want to do that kind of work.”

 

And among the crowd were warnings for the government to take notice, or pay the price at the ballot box.

 

Abu Taher, 42, who runs the T and K Balti House in Leicester, said ministers should not take his community for granted.

 

“The ethnic minority vote has traditionally been with the Labour party, but if they don’t take notice of our concerns then our votes will go elsewhere,” he warned.

 

“They didn’t listen over the Iraq war, and look what’s happened to them. I hope they pay attention now.”

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