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Posts Tagged ‘self determination’

Africans – by Nneka

U keep pushing the blame on our colonial fathers
U say they came and they took all we had pocessed
They have to take the abuse that they have caused our present state with their intruding history
Use our goodness and nourishment in the Name of missionary
Lied to us,blinded slaved us,misplaced us,strengthen us,hardened us then
they replaced us now we got to learn from pain
Now it is up to us to gain some recognition
If we stopp blaming we could get a better condition
Wake up world!!
Wake up and stop sleeping
Wake up africa!!
Wake up and stop blaming
Open ur eyes!!
Stand up and rise
Road block oh life penalty

Why do we want to remain where we started
And how long do we want to stop ourselves from thinking
We should learn from experience that what we are here for this existence
But now we decide to use the same hatred to oppress our own brothers
It is so comfortable to say racism is the cause
but this time it is the same colour chasing and biting us
Knowledge and selfishness that they gave to us,this is what we use to abuse us
Wake up world!!
Wake up and stop sleeping
Wake up africa!!
Wake up and stop blaming
Open ur eyes!!
Stand up and rise
Road block oh life penalty

Those who have ears let them hear
Brothers who are not brainwashed takt ruins and rest
Pick them up and stick them back together
This is the only way we can change this african weather
Lied to us,blinded slaved us,misplaced us,strengthen us,hardened us then
they replaced us now we got to learn from pain

Wake up world!!
Wake up and stop sleeping
Wake up africa!!
Wake up and stop blaming
Open ur eyes!!
Stand up and rise
Road block oh life penalty

you got to wake up please
youuuuu got tooo
(wake up africa wake up and stop blaming)
blaming ha ha ha
open yours eyes your eyes
stand up and riise
road block oh life penalty
wake up…

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The areas of Education, Health & Wellbeing and Cultural Representation as the three areas highlighted as priorities for the 2007 Legacy to lock on  to. These are indeed valid areas in need of attention of African heritage people in this country.

Bristol’s year chose these as some areas to focus on which would be less meaningless than African drumming and dancing in community halls as a mark of the year.

Meanwhile the economic system which requires us to be exploited continues apace. The worship of growth, and rabid privatisation of every service, public and social asset is central to this. Cut costs, increase profits. Which is why slavery was so vital to building up the wealth of modern Britain. A few beads and shells, and shite guns in exchange for people. Reduced inputs – no wages, with high risk (entrepeneurialsm) and profitable raw goods in sugar, cotton, tobacco, coffee and so forth to turn into textiles and other products in exchange for wealth and more people to replace the ones killed and escaped. It was the perfect expression of Capitalism 

“The Man” meanwhile looks for deeper ways to keep control over the masses and the injection of racial hierarchical mythology (in the form of science) was a one of these.

Education, Health & Wellbeing and Cultural Representation are important, but who will have the say and control over how these aspects are worked on. And what makes 2007 and its passing any different to the last forty – four hundred years? These are questions that remain.

The thing is the system needs black and white to think they are each other’s enemies, which will distract from the real source of their oppression, while they are busy cultivating emnity and brawling in the streets.

The visit of Jesse Jackson to the Empire and Commonwealth museum on this Equanomics tour left many things with me, but one thing with stands out.

If African people still walk around or are seen as Debtors to the UK and Europe, then they miss the fact that their black backs built Britain. Upon further inspection they might see themselves as Creditors rather than Debtors. How does this change their attitude to themselves and their world?

This talk and tour was about political and economic liberation. It’s the only language this world seems to understand.  This visit was one worth celebrating. Though the mainstream media seemed to settle only on the ‘Should Bristol apologise’ bit.

For some, if this year made no impact on this political (power) and economic (wealth) rut of Black Britain, then it had no real purpose. Education, Health & Wellbeing and Cultural Representation could have a role but in the hands of local government? Would they for instance interpret Health and Well-being for an African heritage person to include their mental health and the impact of Cultural Disssonance? And the need for culturally specific responses to that possibility? It remains to be seen.

There was a strong message from all the council reps. around that the works which follow will be in equal partnership with stakeholders. With the likes of the voluntary sector.  But my view remains that the voluntary sector has to have capacity to fulfill this equal partnership. 

And as the gap between rich and poor (not black and white) grows exponentially, it seems that the ‘social economy’ will have an even greater role to play in community building.

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